My Guide On: Creating Your Signature Style 

  Although I spend a large majority of my time blogging about trends and new styles to be on the look out for: what matters ultimately is not how well you are able to conform to the latest look, but how great you can show your own personality through your outfits. Personal style is developed over a long period of time and should be a reflection on who you are as a person, what you value and everything you love. 

This may seem as an obvious fact, but I say this because it is surprising how many people believe that their “personal” signature fashion is in fact theirs and “unique”. Not that there is anything wrong with this, but sometimes style such as labeling yourself as “bohemian” or “grunge” on its own is not only limiting: but not exactly your own. 

So, if you are trying to understand how to define your own fashion sense, continue reading for some tips on how to start figuring your style out. 

 
#1: Do make sure that you are comfortable. If you feel that you’re forcing a certain style on yourself that isn’t compatible with you’re personality and are simply purchasing pieces that look “fashionable” for the sake of having a cohesive wardrobe…well not a great idea. The idea of personal style is the opposite of conformity, so don’t be afraid to stand out! After all, if you buy a piece you aren’t so fond of, it’ll only be left in the back of your closet eventually, so focus only the clothing items you absolutely love. 

#2: Don’t constrict yourself to one style, such as labeling yourself as “bohemian” or “girly chic”. Not only are you limiting your choices while shopping, but you also aren’t giving yourself any space to evolve and go through different phases of different styles. Think of it this way: If everyone had a style that stayed the same, then there would be no Fashion Week. The point of fashion is change, so inserting yourself in a style clique isn’t the best choice. 

#3: Do consider your personality. Clothing can make either a great impression or a horrible one, most importantly however: it can give the wrong impression depending on the clothes your wearing. If you’re a very bubbly and overall happy person, but tend to wear a very dark and almost closed-off look, you might seem unapproachable even though you haven’t done anything besides your clothing to suggest that. Style should reflect you as a person, not a look you wish to copy.

#4: Don’t be a copy. It’s tempting. Oh, it’s tempting all right. Because between our breaks when we scroll though fashion Instagram accounts and style-filled blogs with so much inspiration…we find that one icon. All of a sudden you find yourself wanting to purchase that one persons entire wardrobe. But there’s a problem: that not you. As amazing as the clothing that this style icon you see online is, it still isn’t you. Personal style is a journey of style an error, not a journey from a click on a fashion blog to a link where they purchased their coveted clothing. 

#5: Do take notice on your most work pieces. Why do you wear them? Is it because they’re comfortable or maybe because you love how they fit? Notice if there’s a pattern or similar look in these items, and it will be much clearer to visually see what you love to wear. Focusing on this will help you shop easier and give you more of an idea of the colors you usually wear, silohettes you’re most comfortable wearing and prints you love the most. 

#6: Don’t feel like you have to go out of your comfort zone…at least too much. While it’s great to try out new styles of clothing at first, it is also a good idea to focus on a style you already known you love. You’ll be saving time and money by doing so, and your wardrobe will look much more consistent by stocking up on a particular “look”. 

#7: Do purchase the basics. No matter what style you may find yourself loving the most, the basic white tee, black jeans and blazer will almost always be needed. However, even when purchasing the most basic of looks, you can still add a touch of your own personality as well: such as the emblishments on a pant, the cut of a jacket, or even the style of neckline on a simple tee shirt. 

#8: Don’t feel pressured to define a style. Don’t blindly follow a trend for the sake of having something to say when the question on your fashion choices arises. The point of figuring out what exactly you love to wear is the most important part anyways, so don’t be afraid to simply tell the truth. Admitting this to yourself as well, will make it much easier for you to truly think about what style you love. 

#9: Do assess your current fashion situation. This means not only what’s in your closet, but also your online presence. Do you have a Pinterest fashion board, or follow particular fashion bloggers on Instagram? Make sure to really focus on key patterns throughout and try to find an overall idea of what you usually gravitate towards. 

#10: Don’t buy unless you know that a clothing item will work in multiple ways and with different outfits. The last thing you want is a beautiful piece you only wear once!

SOME MORE TIPS! 

–Try This to Figure Out Your Style–
One of the most helpful exercises you can do to understand your fashion sense is going through a pile of magazines, go online or shop in person: and select 10 items. If you’re in a store, take a photo of these pieces (no matter how expensive they are) because instead of quickly making your purchase, notice the pattern. Only chose clothing items you absolutely LOVE. Are the colors similar? Maybe you’ll notice a certain category this clothing goes in. Once you narrow it down, you can focus on finding fashion similar to the pictures you collected:) 

–Go To A Personal Stylist–                        Although not all the time, most of the time a personal stylist can help you figure out what styles, colors and silohettes look best on your body type and personality. Because not only do you want a look that fits your style, but also suits your body type. Trained in understanding different styles, a personal stylist may be of great help to you. 

I hope these tips make it a bit clearer on assisting your style journey:) Let me know in the comments below any other posts you would like me to cover! 

  

3 Back To School Outfit Ideas! 

  There’s only 13 days of school left, and honestly: summer’s felt pretty long! So, to get back into things, I decided to make another post for my back to school series…even though I have to wear a uniform to school…sad:(. Buuuut I guess I’ll just pretend that I’ll be wearing these outfits and share my ideas with you all, anyways 😂. Ok well, allons-y! Here’s he post:)

Look #1)This look is the most casual, perfect for a fast every-day look if you’re rushing for school, but it’s still want to be comfortable. I’m wearing a pair of high waisted black jeans and a basic pair of black converse. I’m not sure where I bought this blouse, but generally what I’ve found is that loose t-shirts with a lower neckline goes perfectly with a pair of dark jeans. Right here, there’s a side view of the backpack I’m wearing this year: it’s a black leather, studded bag. I really like it since its big enough to fit all of my supplies and more. Plus: it’s black so it matches nearly all of my clothes:)

Look #2) This is probably my favorite look of them all,although  not quite fitting for the usual summer weather! Anyways, if you do live in a climate where it’s a bit colder: I suggest a cover up sweate that’s easy to take off if it’s warmer in your classes. Here, I’m wearing this Aztec black and white printed hooded sweater, that I paired with a black camisole and black leggings. To give a bit of color to this outfit, I added a pair of timberland combat boots in gym shoe version, which I love:) 

Look #3)

 This last look is probably the most dressed up of the three. If you’re looking for an outfit that makes you look put together, yet still casual at the same time, then I suggest a similar style as the one in this look here:) I’m wearing a simple white “Celine Paris” tee shirt, tucked into a pair of high waisted black shorts. I’m also wearing a pair of black high tops (Vans). To make the look a bit more on the dressy side, I added this colorful necklace that I purchased from Forever 21. (Sorry, I know it’s a bit hard to see the details in these photos)

And these are my 3 looks for back to school:) Hope you were a bit inspired, and if you liked it, I’d love to hear back on more posts you would like me to create for the future. 

Blog soon, 

 

8 Pieces, 8 Outfits: Making The Most of Your Wordrobe! 

 Hey girls! I am pretty excited to post today, because I’ve been wanting to do this post since last year when I first started blogging, and that is a “Fashion Mixology” type post! I was inspired by the well-known blog: A Beautiful Mess, and decided I would finally recreate the post, but with my own style. So, If you aren’t familiar with the series, basically the idea is to inspire you to get moe creative with your outfit choices. I know I to only ever wear 20% of my wardrobe, but what if you can strech your closet farther? The goal of this post is basically to use 8 pieces and recreate their use into 8 outfits. It was a bit challenging but I was surprised by some of the combinations I never thought of wearing! So, without further ado, here are the 8 outfits.

Outfit #1) So,for this outfit I used three of my pieces: a black blazer, an American flag top, and a pair of black shorts. Since the top was a bit too casual, I added a pair of BCBG gold and black sandals, and the black blazer to give it a more professional yet still laid back look. Wearing shorts with a blazer is a fun touch, as mixing business-wear with casual gives it a unique summer-feel.

Outfit #2) So, for this outfit, I decided to pair a denim jacket without sleeves to suit the current 75 degree weather, and also paired it with a pair of khaki pants. I decided on wearing these awesome all-year-round type boots from Forever 21 as well: They are made quite thin, so they are still “socially acceptable” by wearing these this summer. I think this is a much more casual look you can definitely wear pretty much anywhere but still look put together:) 

Outfit #3) For the third outfit, I kept the khaki pants, but paired it with a camisole and a floral black kimono. I really love this look, because it is so perfect for the summer, and great for breezy days, when you need a cover-up but don’t want to be too hot. A added a pair of simple black lace ballet flats to complete the look, as well as this adorable elephant necklace I wear way too much that I got from Forever 21:)

Outfit #4) This time around, I wore my black shorts, and gold sandals. I also swapped out necklaces and opted for an cute Eiffel Tower necklace I got a while back. I think this outfit is perfect for a walk in the park, a day at the zoo, anything outdoorsy really. I really love the floral print of the kimono that really makes me want to go outside and explore:) 

  Outfit #5) Now, I added another of my 8 outfit pieces: a maroon skirt from the first Bethany Mota collection at Aeropostale, which I’m still so excited about having! I added my black blazer and a pair of black Doc Martens to complete the look. It looked a bit plain, so I decided on this colorful statement necklace I absolutely love:) 

Outfit #6) I decided to dress down a bit for this one, as my 5th outfit was a bit too business-like. I swapped my shoes out for these cream boots, a triangle-overlapping necklace and the denim jacket. I really like this outfit, because it looks very simple, yet put together at the same time. It’s very versatile and can be worn at many occasions, which I love:)

Outfit #7) My last piece I chose was a leather skirt, which I used in two outfits. Here, I once again wore my black blazer and a pair of lace ballet flats. I really love this look, because it reminds me a lot of an outfit you can use for a job interview, a speech, or a business-occasion type event. 

Outfit #8) Finally, for my last outfit, I wore my floral cover up and a pair of high top maroon shoes. This look is actually the only one I have ever worn in reality, and I am so glad I did this fashion-swapping challenge, because now I am so happy to feel like my whole wardrobe has expanded! 

  

20 Ways To Make You’re Fashion Sketchbook Awesome!

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*Beware: This is an extremely long post and I felt like I just needed to warn you before you tire yourself from scrolling further. That being said, I will not hold it against you if you can’t get past this. But, if you do then you’re pretty awesome. Okay I’ll stop writing now! Here’s my long post:*

Have you ever attempted to create a fashion sketchbook, and in the process run out of inspiration? Ideas? Have you ever spent hours on one page to make sure it is absolutely perfect? Well, you’re definitely not alone. For this second part of my “Designing A Collection” mini series, I talked to experienced fashion illustrators on Twitter and Pinterest and they gave me a couple of helpful pointers when creating my first fashion sketchbook. Because to be honest, I don’t really feel I can give you adequate advice on many parts of this series, since it is my first attempt at drawing a whole collection! But, with the helpful users on these platforms, I have a better idea on how to guide you all, if you are interested in creating a fashion sketchbook or improving it!

1) Always Carry You’re Sketchbook!
For this first point, I have to admit that I have never felt comfortable doing. There’s just something about carrying a sketchbook that makes me feel pressured to have beautiful artwork page after page on display, as I open it up anywhere in public. I feel like people might be expecting some grandeur piece of art, and would be disappointed when they look over my shoulder and see what I actually drew. Ooorrr, yes I do admit that it is also that annoying feeling I bet some of you can relate to, if you attempt drawing in public: when people will repeatedly ask you: What/who are you drawing? Like honestly, i don’t think many understand that I don’t draw specific people. I draw fashion models, and rarely a specific person, but for some reason, someone will always insist that I am drawing a specific person and I don’t want to tell them…like seriously why….
Despite this agonizing feeling I feel much too often, I have to say that carrying a drawing pad with you is a great idea when you get inspiration and you have access to a medium to transfer these thoughts into. It may be a little hard at first, but I will certainly attempt this.

2) Don’t Let the Opinions of Others Influence You’re Art
If someone doesn’t understand you’re artwork, don’t let it bother you. If someone frowns as they turn the page of you’re drawing pad and mumbles something seemingly negative, simply let it pass. This is not to say that you shouldn’t accept constructive criticism however, as I think it can-at many times- give you a unique/new perspective and inspiration. What I am saying though, is that you shouldn’t downplay you’re artwork you took so long to complete, and all you get for it is a simple “Nice” when you ask people’s opinions on it. Because to be honest, not enough of society values art: and that’s ok. So, just don’t let that influence what you draw. Fashion sketching is all about originality anyways.

3) Don’t Be Pressured Into Finishing Every Page
I cannot agree with this statement any more than I do right now, because I cannot even begin to tell you how many times this drove me crazy: sometimes you have “artists block”. When this happens, it is best to let that work sit for a while, before going back to it. More often than not, what would happen is that you end up finishing in an even better approach to you’re art than before. It is so much better than to rush finish a page, or try to finish a sketchbook in the whole “6 months” thing, as I know many people do. Because when you do that, you’ll go back and find that quality really does add up much more than quantity ever will.

4) Be Open Minded Into What Inspired You’re Designs
For this mini-series, my later posts will start to go into detail on my own fashion illustration, and one of them will go into detail as to how to get inspiration to begin. I think one of the most important parts of fashion collections and their inspirations, is to be open-minded. For me, when I started researching different topics to form my mood board, I already had an idea on where I wanted it to go, as I had already focused on an “Alice in Wonderland” theme. However, as I scrolled through my trusty Pinterest app (yup, obsessed with it to, not exactly proud of it) I realized that having one topic and stopping there was simply not enough. What I’m trying to say here I guess, is that you’re final inspiration for a fashion collection should not be a broad topic. It should zero in or pinpoint on multiple and specific things. So, I elaborated, and in the end what inspired me was: “I was
focusing on a fantasy-driven Alice in Wonderland theme. I really want to convey a modernization on the classic, giving it a more futuristic feel. I was inspired by the softness of the flowers in some of the photos (in my mood board) and how they complement some of the more dark and mysterious photos. I think that this really captures how Alice is very girly and young, but is brought into this new and weird fantasy place that is much more different that she has ever seen before. The contrast between the two, I think suits it, with both having very different styles.”

5) Create a Visual Moodboard For A New Collection Idea
One of the most important points in the design process is to keep teach of all of you’re ideas and thoughts for you’re collection, together. Every photo, every magazine clipping and even every post-it note you scribbled a quick inspiration on. All combined is you’re true final design. If you would like to read more about this step, I have went ahead and created a separate post, which you can read here. >Click me!

6) Decorate the Cover and Make it Unique!
I know that a lot of the time, those who draw may find it difficult to “ruin” their perfectly good covers…I know I am. But sometimes, it’s simply good to remember that the sketchbook is primarily where you’re rough sketches go: not you’re final. I think that many people get caught up in the process of perfecting every detail and making sure that their books are in mint condition for presentation, as if it were a portfolio! Just keeping that in mind, I think can help a lot to loosen up a bit and really become creative.

7) Annotate and Add Notes Explaining You’re Thinking Process
Starting a fashion sketchbook for me, is not only for fun, but essentially a very good practice for I hope is to come: creating a portfolio to enroll in fashion college. I think that it’s a very good way to practice, therefore I want to create a sketchbook as realistic as I can to replicate one of an application. How do I do this? Adding detailed side notes! (Because you know, if you have captions, you know it’s serious) whether it describes you’re thinking process or the fabrics you plan to use, adding these notes on the side can not only add a nice sophisticated and finished look to you’re art, but give a more in-depth look to those viewing you’re designs on you’re thinking process along the way.

8) Use a Variety of Mediums
Paint, pastels, markers and fabric swatches. Magazine clippings and printed photos. Whatever it is, it is always a good thing when you are able to experiment with different mediums and use them in you’re sketchbook. This, and it will certainly make you’re drawings full of variation and will open you up to a more creative way to express you’re ideas on paper.

9) Don’t Be Afraid To Draw Something Other Than Fashion
Most of the time, a fashion sketchbook is rarely just filled with fashion illustration. It’s filled with pages and pages of inspiration, ideas and gives a story of how you came to you’re final clothing pieces. So, even if it might not seem so, drawing something other than fashion can still be completely relevant. Adding songs that correlate with the songs you can picture at the runway show that would open you’re collection is a nice touch that can still be relevant to you’re theme and topic. An inspirational poem, a collage of images. All of this can connect perfectly well and in the end create a very interesting sketchbook:)

10) Do Research On You’re Inspiration
Broaden you’re ideas so that if someone were to view you’re sketchbook and you weren’t there to explain every detail, and they would still understand it. Think of you’re drawing pad as a storyboard, and if you do this, the most important step is to do research on you’re inspiration. Once you have a clear idea on what you wan to convey in you’re collection, the final project will more than likely show what you had in mind. Because I know that the most frustrating thing in the process is to have an idea and not be able to draws it as you imagined it.

11) Give Every Page A Unique Touch
I totally agree with this one, as many have given my pointers to translate this onto my sketchbook as well. So, to try this for the first time, I decided to fill my first page with a page from Alice in Wonderland, to fit my inspiration for the collection:) I took this a step further thought, and went ahead and hand-wrote the text in small cursive to create a background to my first page. When you give every page a unique touch, you give it character and makes it so much more fun to look at, I guess!

12) Know That Any Page Could Be Part Of You’re Portfolio
I hope that when I say this, it doesn’t cause you to think that I am contro diction myself with the last tips above with “not taking every page too seriously”, but I would like to simply point out that it is true: if you have a goal of becoming a designer (as I dream of becoming as well) it is important to realize that a page of you’re sketchbook could easily be torn out and used for college applications and/or portfolios. That being said, take pride in you’re work and take you’re time not to rush on every page simply just to see you’re drawings being filled. Again: quality over quantity.

13) Learn to Draw Fabrics, Folds, and Patterns
To me, one of the things that bothers me the most about drawing fashion illustrations is not to be able to translate my design in my head onto paper. Learning how to draw fabrics, folds and patterns allows you to better illustrate you’re ideas. Sometimes, practicing different patterns again and again is a good drawing exercise as well, as it is much easier later when you draw the pattern on the model. Learning how to properly sketch folds creates a more realistic image as well.

14) Learning To Draw Professional Patterns Is Really Impressive!
With little reasearch, I quickly found out that the number one things that fashion students-no matter what school they attended-all agreed that the most bothersome and tedious part in the design process. However, even though it is the most technical part of the whole thing, it is the most inportant. This is something that I have found really hard to learn, and need further learning on. Although I can say: if you are able to add some technical design addition to you’re sketchbook…it will be much more professional and quite impressive to many:)

15) Re-Draw A Certain Part of an Outfit Larger, Draw a Detailed Sketch
Let’s say that the main part or the star today the outfit you are designing are the shoes. However, when you draw the model,you are not able to fill every detail. It is always a good idea to re-draw these details on the side of you’re paper, simply to capture the exact detail you wanted to show in you’re design:)

16) Focus On Coloring You’re Illustrations
Most of the time, I am generally nervous when I attempt to add color to one of my illustrations because more often than not, I will always regret the outcome of it. It is defiantly not my strongest area, but nevertheless is still an important skill to have. (Even though it may seem funny to call coloring a skill) Either way, adding color to you’re sketches can easily make or break them, as I’ve learned the hard way. At the end of the day though, practice does make perfect, Prismacolor markers or not!

17) Know Who You Are Designing For
You can create the prettiest collection in the world, but in the end what counts is it’s commercial potential. Will it sell, and how large is that market? Stick with that target area and design only for a specific group of people. Whether it be women’s, juniors or kids, it is always a good idea to start with only one “audience” I would say, and then branch out from there. This way, it won’t be overwhelming for the consumer, and you can focus more on the design when you get to know what you’re target costumer want to see.

18) Add Any Samples of Pieces You Created
If you actually being on of you’re designs to life, and be able to display them, that is awesome! Not a lot of people get the chance to do this, so you are ahead already:) Adding photos of garments or even outfits you have made can show you’re hardworking, determined and most importantly: already have experience in the field.

19) What Is You’re Reason For Making the Fashion Sketchbook?
This is a very important question to ask yourself, when starting a fashion collection. Is it for fun? For school? So you plan on using it for you’re portfolio? (College, internship, job opening) Knowing how to answer this simple, but significant question many allow you to focus in on creating a sketchbook that includes the aspects of what you personally need. For instance: a college application. If you plan on attending fashion school, you will need a portfolio to present to them. On every schools website, they have exact steps you need to follow on what you should include in you’re final. So, this is a very important question.

20) Add You’re Contact Info!
Now, after you have worked so hard on you’re sketchbook, the last thing you want is to lose it! (This would seriously be so depressing though, so please add you’re contact info!) Add some information, so that you have a chance of retrieving in:)

Aaannd we have finally reached the end of this quite painfully long post! I know that I tend to write long like this, but I simply cannot seem to shorten them! Anyways, stay tuned for the next installment of this mini-series in designing a collection, that deals with fashion illustration and the “croquis”!

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New Blog Series! Creating a Fashion Collection

I have really been focusing on Moodboards for future fashion illustration ideas, so I thought I would make a mini series on my first attempt of a collection design. I think that it will be pretty interesting, as I blog about the process I take to create fashion illustrations and to reach my finished product:)

Today, I would like to share my first step in the process: The Moodboard. Because while top designers use these to clue in anticipating consumers for their latest collections, I use them merely for inspiration. Because, quite frankly, it is extremely hard to create a cohesive collection if you aren’t sure of the direction you’re taking. Now, it is true that everyone is different in the way they first approach a new fashion collection draft. Personally, because I just draw fashion for the fun of it- 🙂 – I like to start of with a Moodboard to help me in the direction I want to go.

Photography is definitely a medium that really inspires me, so I created this collage, shown below, that really captures the theme I want to create in my designs.

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For this blog series, I will be focusing on a fantasy-driven Alice in Wonderland theme. I really want to convey a modernization on the classic, giving it a more futuristic feel. I was inspired by the softness of the flowers in some of the photos and how they complement some of the more dark and mysterious photos. I think that this really captures how Alice is very girly and young, but is brought into this new and weird fantasy place that is much more different that she has ever seen before. The contrast between the two, I think suits it, with both having very different styles.

Now, once I have a clear idea where I want my collection to go, I would go on to the next step, which is moving everything on my digital photo collage and making one by hand. Because sometimes, it is best to both view you’re inspiration and try to recreate it. You will see that by doing this step, you will most definitely get more out of you’re original idea and have a new view on the direction you want to take. Basically, I would say that you should never rush the process.

So, in this step, a good way you can start to create these ideas and transfer them onto you’re paper is: a sketchbook! You can draw quick sketches, create a collage from magazine clippings or attach you’re favorite swatches for inspiration. I actually have not created a fashion sketchbook at all, and I recently purchased a good quality spiral-bound art book, which I am really excited to try out! Here are some examples of some fashion sketchbooks that really inspired me:

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Moodboards have proven to be a great help to me, and it really gives me a clear vision as to what I want to achieve in the end. It’s what you refer back to when you’re done with a project, but you ask yourself: “Is this really done, or do I need something more?” Usually, when this happens it’s because the aesthetic you had it mind either wandered off, branching off into a different direction, or…you’re missing something, and you’ll probably need something to refer back to. Hence, the Moodboard! Honestly, I think that it can easily be the most important step in creating a collection.

The next step in this little series is all about sketchbooks! I’m not sure when I’ll have this posted, but I will as soon as school gives me a break!

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The Evolution Of Fashion since 1920!!

Ello der fellow readers! Today, I will be telling you a story about the changes in fashion! I must say though, I was a bit concerned with my title: I don’t want anyone to think that I am trying I say our fashion is better now than in the past (which is what evolving pretty much implies), so please for this article, think of it as just change:)
This will cover the 1920’s to Present.

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The 20s
It was the decade that brought fashion into the modern era. As widely referred to as the Roaring Twenties, it was the most defining  style time period of the flapper; as they dressed more comfortably rather than wearing constricting clothing and defined this new era by showing their discontent with society.

The economy and community have always played a large role in what was seen on the runways and on the women who loved fashion in their day. The 1920’s was a time of rebellion from the past constricting Edwardian style. At this point, you begin to see that women make a bold statement as the wear pants now, thus the Flapper being born shortly after. It was a time of freedom with the end of the First World War, and many changes were made right after this altered time in history.

Previously, high fashion was only available to the wealthy but with the simplicity of the flapper dress and other styles of the time, women were able to make their own clothing. Most of the clothing such as the skirts and dresses were either knee-length or mid-calf. The Art Deco style was born, as most of the clothing at this time was inspired by architecture. Also notable from this time period was the fact that these women wanted to look like slender, flat chested girls rather than a curvy one. 🙂

Today, with the release of Baz Lehmann’s The Great Gatsby 2013 remake, and the fall 1920’s inspired looks on the runway, you can be sure that the modern day has not forgotten this time period of  women finally getting more recognition as they dared to dress differently no matter the consequences which ended up being a very stylish era.

 

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The 30s

This time period was known as the “Stylish Thirties”, which brought back the more contemporary lady like look whose main feature for this period being the emphasis of the shoulders. This was a time of great economic troubles with the Great Depression, as Americans turn to Europe for inspiration. As for the fashion that came out of this era, the silhouette was still slender and elegant coming from the 1920’s, however the flat chest and no curves idea totally vanishes at this point. “The 1930’s women sported her figure, emphasized by fabrics cut on the bias for a more feminine drape and stretch”-(Jessicaboivin.com)

The norm quickly became daily grooming taking up countless hours or a woman’s day, as looks were now priority. The female appearance became softer in a way and more refined with the artful use of makeup and a hair perm to enhance their natural beauty. Since women had a more productive and busier lifestyle in this time period, their clothing matched their daily routines. Clothing was simple paired pieces that allowed women to move freely and function with freedom and ease. This is now simply known as daywear.

Nonetheless, there was still nightwear. More luxurious gowns were kept for the evening and fabrics were now being sorted into to categories of day and night. For the evening, fabrics such as metallic with plastic sequins and glass beads made every night look all the more elegant. Ooohhh, so sophisticated! Why its called the Stylish 20’s perhaps?

 

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The 40s

The 40’s was a time where fashion was basically put almost entirely aside when WW11 started in 1941. When the men went off to war and the women stayed on the home front, these women went to work in the factories to help the war effort and support their country.

However, there was a restriction on wool and other fabrics because of the great demand for uniforms and other war materials. Japanese Silk was for obvious reasons now banned in the U.S. after Pearl Harbor. As a result, women’s fashion made out of Japan’s fabric exports (such as nylon) were stopped.

Nevertheless, women found a way to cope with the low supply of fabric, and used different materials resulting in shorts and jumpsuits. The one piece bathing suit now turned into two-piece as well because of their fabric restrictions.

In 1947, Christian Dior introduces the New Look: this brought the famous A-line skirt, later made famous by stars such as Audrey Hepburn in Roman Holiday:)

 

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The 50s

In the 1950’s Christian Dior’s New Look was still very popular and it served for more designs inspired by his, in the near future. Grace Kelly and (as mentioned before) Audrey Hepburn were introduced as the decade’s style icons.

At this point, the wartime restrictions had been lifted by the nylon was still in heavy rotation. A very significant feature of this era was the great transition and awareness of feminism. Independence ideas and equality to the men that came back from the war was recognized. They played a huge price and helped immensely in the war effort and the men saw this, and at least for this time, women got to be a lot more outspoken than before.

Aside from feminism, FEMININITY (pretty much contradicting if you ask me) also grew during this time as women wanted to resemble their favorite movie starlets.

Fashion was all about soft silhouettes, corseted waists and a full A line skirt. It was pretty much their uniformed look:p Besides the A line, the pencil skirt also arose. This was normally paired with a blouse and a boxy jacket. During this memorable era, women always wanted to have a sense of connection or force with other American women (kind of like a social nationalism but for females)

“To this day, Dior pays homage to this decade and it’s elegant style” (examiner.com)

 

 

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The 60’s

The 60’s kept a lot of the aspects that began in the fifties, until 1965. The mini skirt was made popular in 1967 when young girls all over America caught on to the British invasion of the “Chelsea Look”. A woman named Mary Quant waned to provide these girls with something new and innovative and she gained inspiration from Correges’ 1964 designs of the mini skirt. So, she created a mini that was 6 to 7 inches above the knee and made out of fabrics like PVC.

It was a time of innovation, trial and error and yet it was a bit reminiscent of the 50’s with the conservative and restrained look. It was a classic style and design. But, just as the late 1960’s hit, a drastic change was made. Bright colors, tie-dye, a mini skirts erupted and sold everywhere in America. :It was almost like the 1950’s bottled everyone up so much that the late 1960’s exploded like an old pressure cooker!”(retrowaste.com)

One thing that is really worth mentioning is the fact that Paris was no longer the fashion center in the world. The British invasion didn’t stop with the Beatles, but swept in and definitely had strong spheres of influence in the American fashion life.

Finally, lost into the center of conservative and bold were the mid-60’s. Long slender shapes, bright colors and a young London look. (This look was really pretty but unfortunately didn’t last that long)

 

 

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The 70’s

Similar to the pattern that other decades had followed, the 70’s changed drastically from the beginning to the end. But, seriously this ear was waaaayyy different than the 60’s! A way of thinking of when the trends really changed, think of it this way: early 70’s are the late 60’s, and the late 70’s are like the early eighties.

Now how can I begin to describe this…interesting style of the 70’s? Umm…flamboyant? Extreme bright colors, long flowing skirts and pants were all on high demand. Oh and hey, it was a bit crazy: Winter or summer, short-shorts didn’t know seasons or boundaries because it never faded throughout the year!  (As well as the skin-tight tees) Oh and don’t forget those roller skates!

Every year, the pants seemed to get wider and wider flares, and it was actually common to have a pair of pants that had an…oh I don’t know..32″  hem on the bottom! This quickly turned into bell-bottoms and couldn’t go anywhere but smaller from there!

Business suits for women emerge as well, when finally all women made the transition into wearing pants. Leisure suits, jump suits, track suits, you name it is was probably widely worn in this era. Gender roles were definitely constrained to a real minimum at this point, and women didn’t really put their appearance as a top priority anymore. This meant, hats weren’t as popular, jewelry was ok, and hair was done in like 5 minutes!

 

 

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The 80s

At this point, it is a bit too recent to actually explain or even see this era as history, so I will just explain a bit of the trends in this era:)

Leg warmers: They were not just for exercising when it came to the 80’s! These were actually commonly seen as a fashion item and paired with mini skirts. They became extremely popular among teens in this age after the film in particular: Fame and Flashdance came out.

Member ONLY Jackets: first introduced in 1981, they were widely worn during this time, men and women alike. They came in a variety of colors although grey being the dominant color worn.

Acid Wash Jeans (or shorts): Basically soaked in chlorine or some other product that removed the top layer of the blue denim color and resulted in a white jean with blue undertone. (I actually heard they were coming back in style. Is this true?) Anyways, if you were really cool in the 80’s chances are you owned a couple of these. (Because apparently in the eighties there was no such thing as owning too much denim!)

Shoulder Pads: Yup. Not just for football players! Women actually went for that squared-shouldered look putting shoulder pads in the majority of their outfits. “Because you know, what woman would not want to look like a football player?”(thegreat80s.com)

Ray-Bans!!!: They were by far the most popular sunglasses worn in the eighties (and even now) They were originally designed in the 50s but Wayfarer had declined in popularity in the 70’s But, it obviously redeemed itself by the time it was 1983 when Tom Cruise wore them for a role in the movie Risky Business. Obviously at this point everyone wanted a pair and they were sold out immediately and the business was back and booming. They were later spotted on other stars such as Michael Jackson, Don Johnson and Madonna.

 

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The 90’s

The Grunge Look was really popular, as it was popularized by a grunge music scene based in Seattle. This usually included thrifted store type apparel like flannel shirts paired with a hat such as a beanie.

As for the hairstyles: The “Rachel” look from Friends was the most popular haircut that you could get:p

Overalls: These actually gained you a lot of popularity in the 90s, so points to you I guess if you had some. Any color and any pattern.

Doc Martens: AKA the best shoes in the world were made popular in the 90s as well. The were THE thing to wear if you were a teen in the 90s. Hopefully the trend is back in right now because I was basically like a 1 year old when this trend was going on so..yeah.

Ripped Jeans also were a trend back them sometimes in cohersion with the older 80’s acid wash and oh maybe you can roll up one pant leg while you’re at it because you know if the rappers do it then everyone should right? LOL. 😀

 

Preset Day: Well, we don’t really need to explain what we are living so I’ll just share some pictures with you:)

(Oh and fun fact, this post is 2014 words exactly including the title:) Figured it be fun to match to the year)

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My A-Z Fashion Terminology Guide!

Hello everyone! Today, I have prepared another resource post:) I really find these helpful for myself to easily go back to when I need some quick info on a certain topic, and I really hope that it helps you all as well:) This time, I have made a simple little fashion terminology post, some words much simpler than others but still good to remember. So, whether you are interested in breaking into the fashion industry, (just like I wish as well!) or just want to review some terms, here’s 1 for each letter 😀 A-Z:

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A is for Appliqué
Like Zuhair Murad’s Spring 2014 Couture collection, appliqué is used mainly to cover a rather sheer fabric with ornamented needlework or lace. They’re sewn onto a large piece of fabric to form pictures or patterns. It is perfect for this dress above, as the lace covers a see-through dress: this is appliqué:)

B if for Brocade
Just like Balmain’s Fall 2010 Ready To Wear, brocade is
a fabric (usually silk) woven with a raised pattern, typically with gold or silver thread. In this case, gold:)

C is for Croqius
Croqius’ are quick templates or rough drafts in the fashion world. They are very helpful when it comes to brainstorming a future collection etc., when you already have a template ready to design on, rather than having to draw a model yourself!

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D is for Du Jour
Du Jour simply means current, fashionable, or popular in French. (However, it can also have a different meaning in France: prepared for a given day and on schedule)

E is for Epaulets
Epaulets are ornamental shoulder pieces on an item of clothing, typically on the coat or jacket of a military uniform.

F is for Faux Pas
Also in French, this word can simply mean: a social blunder, and embarrassing blunder in etiquette or conduct. At the same time, the fashion industry uses this word when describing a fashion Don’t or a simple clothing mistake. Example being: gym shoes with business pants, or quite simply…socks with sandals…ew…

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G is for Grunge
On it’s own, grunge could be characterized as being a style of rock music. Pertaining it to fashion however, this music style also has their own fashion sense. The “I don’t care” look, the punk attire. This can range from flannel, ripped jeans, band tee shirts and beanies. Oh, and lots and lots of layering!

H is for Haute Couture
Couture is the designing and making of high-quality fashionable clothes by leading fashion houses, especially to order. They are expensive, valuable and each piece is unique in their own way. It’s an art, and because of this: this part of the industry tends to be more off on its own… catering to elite and wealthy society.

I is for Iridescent Fabric
This fabric is used to create an effect that show luminous colors that seemingly change when seen from different angles. This is usually done with light and airy sheer fabrics, however can be in some instances in thicker more ready-to-wear versions like the Cynthia Rowley dress shown above. Other words that can describe this effect can be opalescent or nacreous.

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J is for Jouy Print
Date: circa 1920
Jouy Print is an 18th century French scenic pattern usually printed on cotton, linen, or silk in one color on a light ground with a usually light blue scene depicting small little scenes of life in France during this time period:) My “Free bag with subscription of Elle magazine!” Has this print and I just noticed it…. :p

K is for Kitsch
This word is mainly used in negative connotation when fashion or design is considered to be in poor taste because of excessiveness or sentimentality, (maybe even perceived as tacky), but sometimes appreciated in an ironic or knowing way.

L is for Lookbook
For fashion bloggers like us, it is quite natural that when we hear Lookbook, we either think of our own lookbooks and ootd’s. However, in a more professional sense in the fashion industry, this word is used to describe the set of photographs displaying a fashion designer’s new collection (assembled for marketing purposes.)

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M is for Modish
When you hear this word, it simply means to conform to, or following what is currently popular and fashionable. Basically, it’s another way to say trendy:)

N is for Normcore
It’s quite a bland anti-style. A quiet movement. A wave to everyone out there that dresses like Steve Jobs or Seinfeld. I wrote a post all about Normcore HERE, if you’re interested:)

O is for Ostentatious
When you are talking about fashion, it means to purposely design a clothing item or accessory to draw attention to yourself. This is used as a negative term, as people who are “ostentatious” are just looking for attention:D

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P is for Pret-a-porter
Pret-A-Porter is Ready-to-Wear in French:)

Q is for Quarter
No, not the coin! In fashion, a quarter is actually referring to the back part of a high heel! A quarter can also mean a “fat quarter” widely used for small sewing projects and samples for clothing designs:)

R is for Riser
This word is used to describe the higher seats in a fashion show. These are used by photographers for magazines and blogs etc. to take a more professional photo as models walk down the runway. These are the most fought-for seats during fashion week!

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S is for Sartorial
The definition of sartorial relates to clothing, or tailored fashion. When someone dresses in high fashion clothing, this is an example of a situation where sartorial fashion would be used to describe their style of dress.

T is for Tear-sheet
A tear sheet is an Advertisement cut from a newspaper or magazine and sent to the advertiser as proof of insertion. This can also mean, a sheet that can easily be torn out from a fashion magazine for a quick resource or a Moodboard collage editorial:)

U is for Unitard
A Unitard is a tight-fitting one-piece garment of stretchable fabric that covers the body from the neck to the knees or feet. (Who wears these and why? Like seriously whee would you go with one of these?!)

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V is for Vogue
So, I couldn’t think of anything for V that wasn’t too obvious or irrelevant to this post. Instead of leaving this letter blank, I chose Vogue:) Definition? Best fashion magazine in the world:D Vogue also means “in style” or up to date in fashion:)

W is for Welt Pockets
According to google define, welt pockets are welt pockets are “Pockets whose opening is adorned and reinforced by one or two thin strips. patch pocket.” Basically they’re just for decoration purposes only, and aren’t actually pockets…these are the originals trolls you guys!

X is for X-Ray Fabric
This fabric is very lightweight and a bit see-through in daylight. Some actually give an illusion of an X-Ray with black and white stripes, while others are simply translucent:)

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Y is for Yoke
A yoke is a shaped pattern piece which forms part of a garment, usually fitting around the neck and shoulders, or around the hips to provide support for looser parts of the garment. (such as a gathered skirt or the body of a shirt.)

Z is for Zardosi
Zardozi is an embroidery colored with metal, which once used to embellish the attire of the Kings and the royals in India! It was also used to adorn walls of the royal tents, scabbards, wall hangings and the paraphernalia of regal elephants and horses. :p

Ooohkaaayy! So that was my little A through Z list:) Was it helpful? Well, I really hope it was, and maybe you learned a couple of new words? 🙂 If you liked this little resource post, share, like and don’t forget to comment!
This post, comment down below some words that could add to this post! What are some fashion terms I didn’t list? I would love to hear!

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How To Tell If You’re Clothing Is Wholesale!

Today, people shop for clothing looking for the style or a certain trend. There are others however that search for originality and unique pieces. It’s very important that they do not purchase anything in wholesale. Wholesale is “the selling of goods in large quantities to be retailed by others” (google dictionary) So, to give you an example, it would be like me buying hundreds of necklaces from an online store and selling them on a different online platform like eBay or Amazon. This would be buying them in a wholesale quantity.

However, this can be done in a store as well. You can buy the items for a huge discount, and then resell them for the full price and make a profit out of it. The sort of wholesale is widely practiced. Not only with individual sellers, but even bigger retail chain stores. The products (mostly clothing and fashion jewelry) are produced thousands of times and distributed around stores and buyers. In the end? We are left with a cookie-cutter style:(

Now, I am not saying that wholesale is completely negative either! The really good about buying this way is the fact that the price is significantly lower, and the design of the clothing item can be a good as something you may have seen at Urban Outfitters. Grated, the quality isn’t as great, but the fact that you can buy clothing at up to even 80% off is amazing! This means that if one of you’re skirts is getting worn out too much, you can just pick up the identical brand new skirt you bought in wholesale!

As great as all of this sounds though, I am blogging today to talk to you about distinguishing if something actually is wholesale. Because the fact of the matter is…we all want to look unique and we want to express our individuality, and we simply cannot do this with wholesale everywhere these days. I really don’t like the idea that everything in my closet was produced for the mass market. I would much rather buy a unique one-of-a-kind clothing item from Etsy:)

It probably seems as though it is soooo easy to avoid these wholesale companies…but it isn’t. Why? Because everyone…we have: Wholesale Retailers. They are basically stores that stock up on everything wholesale and then sell them normally in a store inside a mall. It’s quite easy to distinguish which ones they are too.
So, how do you tell if you are buying items that are Wholesale?
Well, here are some things that you can look out for:

1) The term: “Wholesale designer handbags”

It’s one of the most popular searches on Google for wholesale in general and scammers know this perfectly well. They build websites with the sole intention of scamming people! I (and many other people) quickly notice a new website selling such fake handbags and after a month it’s already gone….um ok then? But only the website is gone, not the scammers! They go on to new websites and try the same tactics and start selling again, so don’t fall for it! This tip is actually a bit more obvious though: if you see the term “wholesale” and “designer” together? I mean really? It’s wholesale!

2) The Images For The Clothes:

If you go on a store website and all of the backdrops to the items are different, and all the models are also completely different? That’s a sign that it’s most likely wholesale because they are using the wholesale images. Not good!

3) The Style & Variations Of An Item:

Most wholesale stores (especially those who revolve around wholesale fashion jewelry) always have quite a similar variety of items. To give you an example: The necklaces are all a similar style, and there might be lots of different colour versions of each one. This, everyone, is usually a huge warning sign of wholesale items.

4) The Seasonal Stock:

Fashion is always changing and retail stores are changing right behind them. New trends come along and seasons come and go as well. The fist thing that you will probably notice is the style of the garments: and wholesale is almost always going to be basics. A basic tee shirt, a plain crop top, a pair of jeans. You wont see any beadwork or any intricate design that looks like it took forever to complete. Basically, they are items that are easy to mass produce in very simple design to reach as many people as possible. Hence, the rock bottom prices.

5) The Price!

This is actually the easiest way to spot fakes. Wholesale sites sell items at very low prices..but not just any items! Things that seem too good to be true like a $30 Chanel bag? Yup. It’s wholesale!

These are only a couple of tips on how to spot these wholesale items:) I hope you learned a bit more about these clothing retailers sell in mass production and where you should buy:) In my opinion, I really don’t think that you should stop buying from these sites necessarily, but I guess I see it as an item that you now thousands of others have that are exactly alike. What do you all think? I would love to hear you’re input:)

Is This Wholesale? How To Tell!

Today, people shop for clothing looking for the style or a certain trend. There are others however that search for originality and unique pieces. It’s very important that they do not purchase anything in wholesale. Wholesale is “the selling of goods in large quantities to be retailed by others” (google dictionary) So, to give you an example, it would be like me buying hundreds of necklaces from an online store and selling them on a different online platform like eBay or Amazon. This would be buying them in a wholesale quantity.

However, this can be done in a store as well. You can buy the items for a huge discount, and then resell them for the full price and make a profit out of it. The sort of wholesale is widely practiced. Not only with individual sellers, but even bigger retail chain stores. The products (mostly clothing and fashion jewelry) are produced thousands of times and distributed around stores and buyers. In the end? We are left with a cookie-cutter style:(

Now, I am not saying that wholesale is completely negative either! The really good about buying this way is the fact that the price is significantly lower, and the design of the clothing item can be a good as something you may have seen at Urban Outfitters. Grated, the quality isn’t as great, but the fact that you can buy clothing at up to even 80% off is amazing! This means that if one of you’re skirts is getting worn out too much, you can just pick up the identical brand new skirt you bought in wholesale!

As great as all of this sounds though, I am blogging today to talk to you about distinguishing if something actually is wholesale. Because the fact of the matter is…we all want to look unique and we want to express our individuality, and we simply cannot do this with wholesale everywhere these days. I really don’t like the idea that everything in my closet was produced for the mass market. I would much rather buy a unique one-of-a-kind clothing item from Etsy:)

It probably seems as though it is soooo easy to avoid these wholesale companies…but it isn’t. Why? Because everyone…we have: Wholesale Retailers. They are basically stores that stock up on everything wholesale and then sell them normally in a store inside a mall. It’s quite easy to distinguish which ones they are too.
So, how do you tell if you are buying items that are Wholesale?
Well, here are some things that you can look out for:

1) The term: “Wholesale designer handbags”

It’s one of the most popular searches on Google for wholesale in general and scammers know this perfectly well. They build websites with the sole intention of scamming people! I (and many other people) quickly notice a new website selling such fake handbags and after a month it’s already gone….um ok then? But only the website is gone, not the scammers! They go on to new websites and try the same tactics and start selling again, so don’t fall for it! This tip is actually a bit more obvious though: if you see the term “wholesale” and “designer” together? I mean really? It’s wholesale!

2) The Images For The Clothes:

If you go on a store website and all of the backdrops to the items are different, and all the models are also completely different? That’s a sign that it’s most likely wholesale because they are using the wholesale images. Not good!

3) The Style & Variations Of An Item:

Most wholesale stores (especially those who revolve around wholesale fashion jewelry) always have quite a similar variety of items. To give you an example: The necklaces are all a similar style, and there might be lots of different colour versions of each one. This, everyone, is usually a huge warning sign of wholesale items.

4) The Seasonal Stock:

Fashion is always changing and retail stores are changing right behind them. New trends come along and seasons come and go as well. The fist thing that you will probably notice is the style of the garments: and wholesale is almost always going to be basics. A basic tee shirt, a plain crop top, a pair of jeans. You wont see any beadwork or any intricate design that looks like it took forever to complete. Basically, they are items that are easy to mass produce in very simple design to reach as many people as possible. Hence, the rock bottom prices.

5) The Price!

This is actually the easiest way to spot fakes. Wholesale sites sell items at very low prices..but not just any items! Things that seem too good to be true like a $30 Chanel bag? Yup. It’s wholesale!

These are only a couple of tips on how to spot these wholesale items:) I hope you learned a bit more about these clothing retailers sell in mass production and where you should buy:) In my opinion, I really don’t think that you should stop buying from these sites necessarily, but I guess I see it as an item that you now thousands of others have that are exactly alike. What do you all think? I would love to hear you’re input:)